STAY IN TOUCH WITH YOUR INSURANCE AGENT

By Woodrow Wilcox

I’m trying to reach a senior citizen client. I have phoned her last known phone number several times. But, I keep getting messages that she is away from her service area.

It is important that I reach her. I have a document now that will help her to get a refund of some of the Medicare supplement insurance premiums that she has paid. But, I can’t reach her by phone. So, I have sent a letter.

The problem with the letter is that she keeps moving. In the past eight months, I have had addresses for her in Collinsville in Illinois and in Lake Village, Chesterton, and Rockville in Indiana. I believe that she just moves from one child’s home to another for a period of time to visit and keep family ties alive and well. That’s fine. But, she should stay in touch with her insurance agent’s office, too.

A number of problems might arise in which it would be good for her insurance agent to know how to reach her. For example, if her insurance company does not get an expected premium payment, it will contact her agent to ask for a check up on her. If her agent can’t reach her to alert her to a problem and help her to fix the problem, after some time, the insurance company will cancel her Medicare supplement insurance policy.

If you are a senior citizen, and you plan to visit somewhere for less than a month, there probably is no need to contact your insurance agent. But, if you plan to visit for a month or more, I suggest that you contact your insurance agent or agency to let someone know that you will be gone and where you will be just in case they need to reach you.

Note: Woodrow Wilcox is the senior medical bill case worker at Senior Care Insurance Services in Merrillville, Indiana. Wilcox has saved clients of that insurance agency over one million dollars by correcting medical bill errors that were often caused by mistakes in the Medicare system. To read other articles by Wilcox, visit www.dakotavoice.com, www.americanclarion.com, or the websites of other publications that use his articles.

© 2012 Woodrow Wilcox

www.WoodrowWilcox.com